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Effects of Sleep, Physical Activity, and Shift Work on Daily Mood: a Prospective Mobile Monitoring Study of Medical Interns

Overview of attention for article published in JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
52 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Effects of Sleep, Physical Activity, and Shift Work on Daily Mood: a Prospective Mobile Monitoring Study of Medical Interns
Published in
JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1007/s11606-018-4373-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

David A. Kalmbach, Yu Fang, J. Todd Arnedt, Amy L. Cochran, Patricia J. Deldin, Adam I. Kaplin, Srijan Sen

Abstract

Although short sleep, shift work, and physical inactivity are endemic to residency, a lack of objective, real-time information has limited our understanding of how these problems impact physician mental health. To understand how the residency experience affects sleep, physical activity, and mood, and to understand the directional relationships among these variables. A prospective longitudinal study. Thirty-three first-year residents (interns) provided data from 2 months pre-internship through the first 6 months of internship. Objective real-time assessment of daily sleep and physical activity was assessed through accelerometry-based wearable devices. Mood scaled from 1 to 10 was recorded daily using SMS technology. Average compliance rates prior to internship for mood, sleep, and physical activity were 77.4, 80.2, and 93.7%, and were 78.8, 53.0, and 79.9% during internship. After beginning residency, interns lost an average of 2 h and 48 min of sleep per week (t = - 3.04, p < .01). Mood and physical activity decreased by 7.5% (t = - 3.67, p < .01) and 11.5% (t = - 3.15, p < .01), respectively. A bidirectional relationship emerged between sleep and mood during internship wherein short sleep augured worse mood the next day (b = .12, p < .001), which, in turn, presaged shorter sleep the next night (b = .06, p = .03). Importantly, the effect of short sleep on mood was twice as large as mood's effect on sleep. Lastly, substantial shifts in sleep timing during internship (sleeping ≥ 3 h earlier or later than pre-internship patterns) led to shorter sleep (earlier: b = - .36, p < .01; later: b = - 1.75, p < .001) and poorer mood (earlier: b = - .41, p < .001; later: b = - .41, p < .001). Shift work, short sleep, and physical inactivity confer a challenging environment for physician mental health. Efforts to increase sleep opportunity through designing shift schedules to allow for adequate opportunity to resynchronize the circadian system and improving exercise compatibility of the work environment may improve mood in this depression-vulnerable population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 5 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Researcher 3 19%
Other 1 6%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 25%
Sports and Recreations 3 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Psychology 2 13%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 116. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2018.
All research outputs
#96,109
of 11,400,290 outputs
Outputs from JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine
#78
of 4,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,617
of 256,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine
#8
of 147 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,400,290 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,008 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,498 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 147 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.