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Acute sleep restriction effects on emotion responses in 30- to 36-month-old children

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Sleep Research, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 1,259)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
34 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs

Citations

dimensions_citation
106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
126 Mendeley
Title
Acute sleep restriction effects on emotion responses in 30- to 36-month-old children
Published in
Journal of Sleep Research, October 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2869.2011.00962.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

REBECCA H. BERGER, ALISON L. MILLER, RONALD SEIFER, STEPHANIE R. CARES, MONIQUE K. LEBOURGEOIS

Abstract

Early childhood is a period of dramatic change in sleep and emotion processing, as well as a time when disturbance in both domains are first detected. Although sleep is recognized as central in emotion processing and psychopathology, the great majority of experimental data have been collected in adults. We examined the effects of acute sleep restriction (nap deprivation) on toddlers' emotion expression. Ten healthy children (seven females; 30-36 months old) followed a strict sleep schedule (≥12.5 h time in bed per 24-h) for 5 days, before each of two randomly assigned afternoon emotion assessments following Nap and No-Nap conditions (resulting in an 11-day protocol). Children viewed emotion-eliciting pictures (five positive, three neutral, three negative) and completed puzzles (one solvable, one unsolvable). Children's faces were video-recorded, and emotion displays were coded. When sleep restricted, children displayed less confusion in response to neutral pictures, more negativity to neutral and negative pictures, and less positivity to positive pictures. Sleep restriction also resulted in a 34% reduction in positive emotion responses (solvable puzzle), as well as a 31% increase in negative emotion responses and a 39% decrease in confused responses (unsolvable puzzle). These findings suggest sleep is a key factor in how young children respond to their world. When sleep restricted, toddlers are neither able to take full advantage of positive experiences nor are they as adaptive in challenging contexts. If insufficient sleep consistently 'taxes' young children's emotion responses, they may not manage emotion regulation challenges effectively, potentially placing them at risk for future emotional/behavioral problems.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 121 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 16%
Researcher 20 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 13%
Student > Master 10 8%
Other 29 23%
Unknown 14 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 61 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Neuroscience 8 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 6%
Social Sciences 5 4%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 24 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 291. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2020.
All research outputs
#50,530
of 15,147,986 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Sleep Research
#9
of 1,259 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#322
of 217,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Sleep Research
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,147,986 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,259 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.