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Assessing the direct occupational and public health impacts of solar radiation management with stratospheric aerosols

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 954)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
214 tweeters
facebook
19 Facebook pages
googleplus
20 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Assessing the direct occupational and public health impacts of solar radiation management with stratospheric aerosols
Published in
Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12940-016-0089-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Utibe Effiong, Richard L Neitzel, Richard L. Neitzel, Effiong, Utibe, Neitzel, Richard L

Abstract

Geoengineering is the deliberate large-scale manipulation of environmental processes that affects the Earth's climate, in an attempt to counteract the effects of climate change. Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors and designed nanoparticles into the stratosphere to (i.e., solar radiation management [SRM]), has been suggested as one approach to geoengineering. Although much is being done to unravel the scientific and technical challenges around geoengineering, there have been few efforts to characterize the potential human health impacts of geoengineering, particularly with regards to SRM approaches involving stratospheric aerosols. This paper explores this information gap. Using available evidence, we describe the potential direct occupational and public health impacts of exposures to aerosols likely to be used for SRM, including environmental sulfates, black carbon, metallic aluminum, and aluminum oxide aerosols. We speculate on possible health impacts of exposure to one promising SRM material, barium titanate, using knowledge of similar nanomaterials. We also explore current regulatory efforts to minimize exposure to these toxicants. Our analysis suggests that adverse public health impacts may reasonably be expected from SRM via deployment of stratospheric aerosols. Little is known about the toxicity of some likely candidate aerosols, and there is no consensus regarding acceptable levels for public exposure to these materials. There is also little infrastructure in place to evaluate potential public health impacts in the event that stratospheric aerosols are deployed for solar radiation management. We offer several recommendations intended to help characterize the potential occupation and public health impacts of SRM, and suggest that a comprehensive risk assessment effort is needed before this approach to geoengineering receives further consideration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 214 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 27%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Researcher 4 15%
Other 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 7 27%
Engineering 3 12%
Unspecified 3 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Computer Science 2 8%
Other 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 207. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2018.
All research outputs
#48,556
of 11,628,153 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
#21
of 954 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,425
of 340,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
#3
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,628,153 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 954 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.