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Understanding patient preference for physician attire: a cross-sectional observational study of 10 academic medical centres in the USA

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 12,171)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
24 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
781 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
Understanding patient preference for physician attire: a cross-sectional observational study of 10 academic medical centres in the USA
Published in
BMJ Open, May 2018
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021239
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher M Petrilli, Sanjay Saint, Joseph J Jennings, Andrew Caruso, Latoya Kuhn, Ashley Snyder, Vineet Chopra

Abstract

Several large studies have shown that improving the patient experience is associated with higher reported patient satisfaction, increased adherence to treatment and clinical outcomes. Whether physician attire can affect the patient experience-and how this influences satisfaction-is unknown. Therefore, we performed a national, cross-sectional study to examine patient perceptions, expectations and preferences regarding physicians dress. 10 academic hospitals in the USA. Convenience sample of 4062 patients recruited from 1 June 2015 to 31 October 2016. We conducted a questionnaire-based study of patients across 10 academic hospitals in the USA. The questionnaire included photographs of a male and female physician dressed in seven different forms of attire. Patients were asked to rate the provider pictured in various clinical settings. Preference for attire was calculated as the composite of responses across five domains (knowledgeable, trustworthy, caring, approachable and comfortable) via a standardised instrument. Secondary outcome measures included variation in preferences by respondent characteristics (eg, gender), context of care (eg, inpatient vs outpatient) and geographical region. Of 4062 patient responses, 53% indicated that physician attire was important to them during care. Over one-third agreed that it influenced their satisfaction with care. Compared with all other forms of attire, formal attire with a white coat was most highly rated (p=0.001 vs scrubs with white coat; p<0.001 all other comparisons). Important differences in preferences for attire by clinical context and respondent characteristics were noted. For example, respondents≥65 years preferred formal attire with white coats (p<0.001) while scrubs were most preferred for surgeons. Patients have important expectations and perceptions for physician dress that vary by context and region. Nuanced policies addressing physician dress code to improve patient satisfaction appear important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 781 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 13 16%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 12%
Other 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Other 32 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 54%
Unspecified 21 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 2%
Other 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 758. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2019.
All research outputs
#7,288
of 13,635,685 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#29
of 12,171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#387
of 272,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#2
of 562 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,635,685 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 562 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.