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Ezetimibe Added to Statin Therapy after Acute Coronary Syndromes

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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1688 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1090 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
Title
Ezetimibe Added to Statin Therapy after Acute Coronary Syndromes
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1410489
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher P. Cannon, Michael A. Blazing, Robert P. Giugliano, Amy McCagg, Jennifer A. White, Pierre Theroux, Harald Darius, Basil S. Lewis, Ton Oude Ophuis, J. Wouter Jukema, Gaetano M. De Ferrari, Witold Ruzyllo, Paul De Lucca, KyungAh Im, Erin A. Bohula, Craig Reist, Stephen D. Wiviott, Andrew M. Tershakovec, Thomas A. Musliner, Eugene Braunwald, Robert M. Califf

Abstract

Background Statin therapy reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, but whether the addition of ezetimibe, a nonstatin drug that reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, can reduce the rate of cardiovascular events further is not known. Methods We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial involving 18,144 patients who had been hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome within the preceding 10 days and had LDL cholesterol levels of 50 to 100 mg per deciliter (1.3 to 2.6 mmol per liter) if they were receiving lipid-lowering therapy or 50 to 125 mg per deciliter (1.3 to 3.2 mmol per liter) if they were not receiving lipid-lowering therapy. The combination of simvastatin (40 mg) and ezetimibe (10 mg) (simvastatin-ezetimibe) was compared with simvastatin (40 mg) and placebo (simvastatin monotherapy). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina requiring rehospitalization, coronary revascularization (≥30 days after randomization), or nonfatal stroke. The median follow-up was 6 years. Results The median time-weighted average LDL cholesterol level during the study was 53.7 mg per deciliter (1.4 mmol per liter) in the simvastatin-ezetimibe group, as compared with 69.5 mg per deciliter (1.8 mmol per liter) in the simvastatin-monotherapy group (P<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier event rate for the primary end point at 7 years was 32.7% in the simvastatin-ezetimibe group, as compared with 34.7% in the simvastatin-monotherapy group (absolute risk difference, 2.0 percentage points; hazard ratio, 0.936; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 0.99; P=0.016). Rates of prespecified muscle, gallbladder, and hepatic adverse effects and cancer were similar in the two groups. Conclusions When added to statin therapy, ezetimibe resulted in incremental lowering of LDL cholesterol levels and improved cardiovascular outcomes. Moreover, lowering LDL cholesterol to levels below previous targets provided additional benefit. (Funded by Merck; IMPROVE-IT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00202878 .).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 523 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,090 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 9 <1%
United States 6 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Mexico 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Other 6 <1%
Unknown 1053 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 172 16%
Other 154 14%
Student > Bachelor 112 10%
Student > Postgraduate 105 10%
Student > Master 104 10%
Other 324 30%
Unknown 119 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 646 59%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 72 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 44 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 2%
Other 60 6%
Unknown 182 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 544. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2019.
All research outputs
#14,687
of 13,968,238 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#652
of 25,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#274
of 235,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#6
of 341 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,968,238 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 25,852 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 65.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,217 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 341 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.