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Haploinsufficiency of myostatin protects against aging‐related declines in muscle function and enhances the longevity of mice

Overview of attention for article published in Aging Cell, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 1,105)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
76 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Haploinsufficiency of myostatin protects against aging‐related declines in muscle function and enhances the longevity of mice
Published in
Aging Cell, March 2015
DOI 10.1111/acel.12339
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mendias, Christopher L., Bakhurin, Konstantin I., Gumucio, Jonathan P., Shallal‐Ayzin, Mark V., Davis, Carol S., Faulkner, John A., Christopher L Mendias, Konstantin I Bakhurin, Jonathan P Gumucio, Mark V Shallal-Ayzin, Carol S Davis, John A Faulkner, Mendias CL, Bakhurin KI, Gumucio JP, Shallal-Ayzin MV, Davis CS, Faulkner JA, Christopher L. Mendias, Konstantin I. Bakhurin, Jonathan P. Gumucio, Mark V. Shallal‐Ayzin, Carol S. Davis, John A. Faulkner

Abstract

The molecular mechanisms behind aging-related declines in muscle function are not well understood, but the growth factor myostatin (MSTN) appears to play an important role in this process. Additionally, epidemiological studies have identified a positive correlation between skeletal muscle mass and longevity. Given the role of myostatin in regulating muscle size, and the correlation between muscle mass and longevity, we tested the hypotheses that the deficiency of myostatin would protect oldest-old mice (28-30 months old) from an aging-related loss in muscle size and contractility, and would extend the maximum lifespan of mice. We found that MSTN(+/-) and MSTN(-/-) mice were protected from aging-related declines in muscle mass and contractility. While no differences were detected between MSTN(+/+) and MSTN(-/-) mice, MSTN(+/-) mice had an approximately 15% increase in maximal lifespan. These results suggest that targeting myostatin may protect against aging-related changes in skeletal muscle and contribute to enhanced longevity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 76 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 19%
Researcher 3 19%
Student > Master 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 4 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 69. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#168,021
of 9,726,785 outputs
Outputs from Aging Cell
#30
of 1,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,257
of 207,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aging Cell
#4
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,726,785 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,105 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.