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Does counting emotion words on online social networks provide a window into people’s subjective experience of emotion? A case study on Facebook.

Overview of attention for article published in Emotion, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
69 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Does counting emotion words on online social networks provide a window into people’s subjective experience of emotion? A case study on Facebook.
Published in
Emotion, April 2018
DOI 10.1037/emo0000416
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ethan Kross, Philippe Verduyn, Margaret Boyer, Brittany Drake, Izzy Gainsburg, Brian Vickers, Oscar Ybarra, John Jonides, E Kross, P Verduyn, M Boyer, B Drake, I Gainsburg, B Vickers, O Ybarra, J Jonides

Abstract

Psychologists have long debated whether it is possible to assess how people subjectively feel without asking them. The recent proliferation of online social networks has recently added a fresh chapter to this discussion, with research now suggesting that it is possible to index people's subjective experience of emotion by simply counting the number of emotion words contained in their online social network posts. Whether the conclusions that emerge from this work are valid, however, rests on a critical assumption: that people's usage of emotion words in their posts accurately reflects how they feel. Although this assumption is widespread in psychological research, here we suggest that there are reasons to challenge it. We corroborate these assertions in 2 ways. First, using data from 4 experience-sampling studies of emotion in young adults, we show that people's reports of how they feel throughout the day neither predict, nor are predicted by, their use of emotion words on Facebook. Second, using simulations we show that although significant relationships emerge between the use of emotion words on Facebook and self-reported affect with increasingly large numbers of observations, the relationship between these variables was in the opposite of the theoretically expected direction 50% of the time (i.e., 3 of 6 models that we performed simulations on). In contrast to counting emotion words, we show that judges' ratings of the emotionality of participants' Facebook posts consistently predicts how people feel across all analyses. These findings shed light on how to draw inferences about emotion using online social network data. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 69 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Researcher 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 36%
Psychology 2 18%
Arts and Humanities 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Computer Science 1 9%
Other 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2018.
All research outputs
#279,700
of 11,472,431 outputs
Outputs from Emotion
#73
of 1,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,540
of 252,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Emotion
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,472,431 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,448 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.