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The Lung Microbiota of Healthy Mice are Highly Variable, Cluster by Environment, and Reflect Variation in Baseline Lung Innate Immunity

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
88 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
The Lung Microbiota of Healthy Mice are Highly Variable, Cluster by Environment, and Reflect Variation in Baseline Lung Innate Immunity
Published in
American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1164/rccm.201711-2180oc
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert P. Dickson, John R. Erb-Downward, Nicole R. Falkowski, Ellen M Hunter, Shanna L Ashley, Gary B. Huffnagle, Dickson, Robert P., Erb-Downward, John R., Falkowski, Nicole R., Hunter, Ellen M, Ashley, Shanna L, Huffnagle, Gary B., John R. Erb-Downward, Nicole R. Falkowski, Ellen M Hunter, Shanna L Ashley, Gary B. Huffnagle

Abstract

The "gut-lung axis" is commonly invoked to explain the microbiome's influence on lung inflammation. Yet the lungs harbor their own microbiome which is altered in respiratory disease. The relative influence of gut and lung bacteria on lung inflammation is unknown. To determine if baseline lung immune tone reflects local (lung-lung) or remote (gut-lung) microbe-host interactions. We compared lung, tongue, and cecal bacteria in forty healthy, genetically-identical 10-week old mice using 16S rRNA gene quantification and sequencing. We measured inflammatory cytokines using a multiplex assay of homogenized lung tissue. We compared lung bacteria in healthy mice treated with varied durations of systemic antibiotics. Lung bacterial communities are highly variable among mice, cluster strongly by cage, by shipment, and by vendor, and are altered by antibiotics in a microbiologically predictable manner. Baseline lung concentrations of two key inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-4) are correlated with the diversity and community composition of lung bacterial communities. Lung concentrations of these inflammatory cytokines correlated more strongly with variation in lung bacterial communities than with that of the gut or mouth. In the lungs of healthy mice, baseline innate immune tone more strongly reflects local (lung-lung) microbe-host interactions than remote (gut-lung) microbe-host interactions. Our results independently confirm the existence and immunologic significance of the murine lung microbiome, even in health. Variation in lung microbiota is likely an important, underappreciated source of experimental and clinical variability. The lung microbiome is an unexplored therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory lung disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 88 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Student > Master 5 19%
Unspecified 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 38%
Unspecified 4 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 62. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2018.
All research outputs
#218,497
of 11,863,087 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine
#146
of 6,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,843
of 272,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine
#9
of 137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,863,087 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,612 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,340 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.