↓ Skip to main content

Michigan Publishing

Article Metrics

Constructing a broadly inclusive seed plant phylogeny

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Botany, February 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 2,674)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
118 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Constructing a broadly inclusive seed plant phylogeny
Published in
American Journal of Botany, February 2018
DOI 10.1002/ajb2.1019
Pubmed ID
Authors

Smith, Stephen A., Brown, Joseph W., Stephen A. Smith, Joseph W. Brown

Abstract

Large phylogenies can help shed light on macroevolutionary patterns that inform our understanding of fundamental processes that shape the tree of life. These phylogenies also serve as tools that facilitate other systematic, evolutionary, and ecological analyses. Here we combine genetic data from public repositories (GenBank) with phylogenetic data (Open Tree of Life project) to construct a dated phylogeny for seed plants. We conducted a hierarchical clustering analysis of publicly available molecular data for major clades within the Spermatophyta. We constructed phylogenies of major clades, estimated divergence times, and incorporated data from the Open Tree of Life project, resulting in a seed plant phylogeny. We estimated diversification rates, excluding those taxa without molecular data. We also summarized topological uncertainty and data overlap for each major clade. The trees constructed for Spermatophyta consisted of 79,881 and 353,185 terminal taxa; the latter included the Open Tree of Life taxa for which we could not include molecular data from GenBank. The diversification analyses demonstrated nested patterns of rate shifts throughout the phylogeny. Data overlap and inference uncertainty show significant variation throughout and demonstrate the continued need for data collection across seed plants. This study demonstrates a means for combining available resources to construct a dated phylogeny for plants. However, this approach is an early step and more developments are needed to add data, better incorporating underlying uncertainty, and improve resolution. The methods discussed here can also be applied to other major clades in the tree of life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 118 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 23%
Student > Master 12 16%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Other 21 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 71%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 13%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Unspecified 4 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Other 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 72. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#184,529
of 11,834,873 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Botany
#16
of 2,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,659
of 317,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Botany
#2
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,834,873 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,674 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,403 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.