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Sex Differences in Sleep-Disordered Breathing After Stroke: Results from the BASIC Project

Overview of attention for article published in Sleep Medicine, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
2 Mendeley
Title
Sex Differences in Sleep-Disordered Breathing After Stroke: Results from the BASIC Project
Published in
Sleep Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.sleep.2017.11.1129
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mollie McDermott, Devin L. Brown, Chengwei Li, Nelda M. Garcia, Erin Case, Ronald D. Chervin, Lewis B. Morgenstern, Lynda D. Lisabeth

Abstract

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), an independent risk factor for stroke, is associated with worse post-stroke outcomes. Differences in the relationship between SDB and stroke may exist for women versus men. In this population-based study, we compared the prevalence of both pre- and post-stroke SDB by sex. We also explored whether menopausal status is related to post-stroke SDB. We performed a cross-sectional study of subjects enrolled in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. Each subject (n = 1815) underwent a baseline interview including the Berlin Questionnaire to assess pre-stroke SDB risk and, if relevant, questions regarding menopausal status. Subjects were offered overnight SDB screening with a validated portable respiratory device (n = 832 with complete data). Log Poisson and linear regression models were used to assess the differences in SDB between men and women with adjustment for demographics, stroke risk factors, stroke severity, and other potential confounders. Women were less likely than men to be at high risk for pre-stroke SDB (56.6% versus 61.9%) (prevalence ratio [PR] 0.87 for women; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-0.95). A lower proportion of women than men (50.8% versus 70.2%) had post-stroke SDB by respiratory monitoring (PR 0.71; 95% CI, 0.63-0.80). SDB severity was higher for men than for women (mean difference in respiratory event index [REI] 6.5; 95% CI, 4.3-8.7). No significant association existed between post-stroke SDB and either menopausal status or age at menopause. After acute ischemic stroke, SDB was more prevalent and more severe in men than in women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 1 50%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#884,530
of 11,626,332 outputs
Outputs from Sleep Medicine
#199
of 2,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,332
of 311,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sleep Medicine
#13
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,626,332 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,190 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,708 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.