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Connectedness to family, school, peers, and community in socially vulnerable adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in Children & Youth Services Review, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 2,314)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
236 Mendeley
Title
Connectedness to family, school, peers, and community in socially vulnerable adolescents
Published in
Children & Youth Services Review, October 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.08.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cynthia Ewell Foster, Adam Horwitz, Alvin Thomas, Kiel Opperman, Polly Gipson, Amanda Burnside, Deborah M. Stone, Cheryl A. King

Abstract

Youth who feel connected to people and institutions in their communities may be buffered from other risk factors in their lives. As a result, increasing connectedness has been recommended as a prevention strategy. In this study, we examined connectedness among 224 youth (ages 12-15), recruited from an urban medical emergency department, who were at elevated risk due to bullying perpetration or victimization, or low social connectedness. Regression analyses examined multiple domains of connectedness (family, school, peer, community) in relation to adjustment. Youth who felt more connected to parents reported lower levels of depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury, and conduct problems, higher self-esteem and more adaptive use of free time. Youth who felt more connected to their school reported lower levels of depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, social anxiety, and sexual activity, as well as higher levels of self-esteem and more adaptive use of free time. Community connectedness was associated with less social anxiety but more sexual activity, and peer connectedness was not related to youth adjustment in this unique sample. Findings suggest that family and school connectedness may buffer youth on a trajectory of risk, and may therefore be important potential targets for early intervention services.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 236 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 236 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 15%
Student > Master 36 15%
Student > Bachelor 35 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 11%
Researcher 23 10%
Other 28 12%
Unknown 52 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 74 31%
Social Sciences 35 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 7%
Computer Science 5 2%
Other 17 7%
Unknown 65 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 138. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2021.
All research outputs
#169,364
of 17,538,071 outputs
Outputs from Children & Youth Services Review
#13
of 2,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,026
of 287,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Children & Youth Services Review
#3
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,538,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,314 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,148 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.