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Article Metrics

Media Use in School-Aged Children and Adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatrics, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 14,153)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
233 news outlets
blogs
16 blogs
twitter
94 tweeters
facebook
17 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
3 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
157 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
452 Mendeley
Title
Media Use in School-Aged Children and Adolescents
Published in
Pediatrics, October 2016
DOI 10.1542/peds.2016-2592
Pubmed ID
Abstract

This policy statement focuses on children and adolescents 5 through 18 years of age. Research suggests both benefits and risks of media use for the health of children and teenagers. Benefits include exposure to new ideas and knowledge acquisition, increased opportunities for social contact and support, and new opportunities to access health-promotion messages and information. Risks include negative health effects on weight and sleep; exposure to inaccurate, inappropriate, or unsafe content and contacts; and compromised privacy and confidentiality. Parents face challenges in monitoring their children's and their own media use and in serving as positive role models. In this new era, evidence regarding healthy media use does not support a one-size-fits-all approach. Parents and pediatricians can work together to develop a Family Media Use Plan (www.healthychildren.org/MediaUsePlan) that considers their children's developmental stages to individualize an appropriate balance for media time and consistent rules about media use, to mentor their children, to set boundaries for accessing content and displaying personal information, and to implement open family communication about media.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 94 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 452 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 449 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 91 20%
Student > Bachelor 64 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 10%
Researcher 43 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 41 9%
Other 101 22%
Unknown 67 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 109 24%
Psychology 66 15%
Social Sciences 51 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 9%
Sports and Recreations 13 3%
Other 79 17%
Unknown 92 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2053. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2021.
All research outputs
#1,859
of 16,641,846 outputs
Outputs from Pediatrics
#12
of 14,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35
of 298,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatrics
#3
of 204 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,641,846 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,153 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,075 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 204 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.