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Gender and Time for Sleep among U.S. Adults

Overview of attention for article published in American Sociological Review, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
101 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Gender and Time for Sleep among U.S. Adults
Published in
American Sociological Review, January 2013
DOI 10.1177/0003122412472048
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer A. Ailshire, Sarah A. Burgard, Burgard, Sarah A, Ailshire, Jennifer A, S. A. Burgard, J. A. Ailshire

Abstract

Do women really sleep more than men? Biomedical and social scientific studies show longer sleep durations for women, a surprising finding given sociological research showing women have more unpaid work and less high-quality leisure time compared to men. We assess explanations for gender differences in time for sleep, including compositional differences in levels of engagement in paid and unpaid labor, gendered responses to work and family responsibilities, and differences in napping, bedtimes, and interrupted sleep for caregiving. We examine the overall gender gap in time for sleep as well as gaps within family life-course stages based on age, partnership, and parenthood statuses. We analyze minutes of sleep from a diary day collected from nationally representative samples of working-age adults in the American Time Use Surveys of 2003 to 2007. Overall and at most life course stages, women slept more than men. Much of the gap is explained by work and family responsibilities and gendered time tradeoffs; as such, gender differences vary across life course stages. The gender gap in sleep time favoring women is relatively small for most comparisons and should be considered in light of the gender gap in leisure time favoring men at all life course stages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Unknown 95 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 25%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Researcher 13 13%
Other 20 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 50 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 12%
Psychology 11 11%
Unspecified 9 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 7%
Other 12 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 125. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2018.
All research outputs
#89,521
of 11,483,896 outputs
Outputs from American Sociological Review
#52
of 1,240 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,391
of 311,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Sociological Review
#3
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,483,896 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,240 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.