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Article Metrics

Where to Focus Efforts to Reduce the Black–White Disparity in Stroke Mortality

Overview of attention for article published in Stroke, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#41 of 10,325)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
52 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
Title
Where to Focus Efforts to Reduce the Black–White Disparity in Stroke Mortality
Published in
Stroke, July 2016
DOI 10.1161/strokeaha.115.012631
Pubmed ID
Authors

George Howard, Claudia S. Moy, Virginia J. Howard, Leslie A. McClure, Dawn O. Kleindorfer, Brett M. Kissela, Suzanne E. Judd, Fredrick W. Unverzagt, Elsayed Z. Soliman, Monika M. Safford, Mary Cushman, Matthew L. Flaherty, Virginia G. Wadley

Abstract

At age 45 years, blacks have a stroke mortality ≈3× greater than their white counterparts, with a declining disparity at older ages. We assess whether this black-white disparity in stroke mortality is attributable to a black-white disparity in stroke incidence versus a disparity in case fatality. We first assess if black-white differences in stroke mortality within 29 681 participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort reflect national black-white differences in stroke mortality and then assess the degree to which black-white differences in stroke incidence or 30-day case fatality after stroke contribute to the disparities in stroke mortality. The pattern of stroke mortality within the study mirrors the national pattern, with the black-to-white hazard ratio of ≈4.0 at age 45 years decreasing to ≈1.0 at age 85 years. The pattern of black-to-white disparities in stroke incidence shows a similar pattern but no evidence of a corresponding disparity in stroke case fatality. These findings show that the black-white differences in stroke mortality are largely driven by differences in stroke incidence, with case fatality playing at most a minor role. Therefore, to reduce the black-white disparity in stroke mortality, interventions need to focus on prevention of stroke in blacks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 19%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 30%
Neuroscience 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 387. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2021.
All research outputs
#44,371
of 17,932,315 outputs
Outputs from Stroke
#41
of 10,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,320
of 274,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stroke
#5
of 142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,932,315 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,325 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,702 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.