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Illness Severity and Work Productivity Loss Among Working Adults With Medically Attended Acute Respiratory Illnesses: US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network 2012–2013

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
49 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
53 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Illness Severity and Work Productivity Loss Among Working Adults With Medically Attended Acute Respiratory Illnesses: US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network 2012–2013
Published in
Clinical Infectious Diseases, November 2015
DOI 10.1093/cid/civ952
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua G. Petrie, Caroline Cheng, Ryan E. Malosh, Jeffrey J. VanWormer, Brendan Flannery, Richard K. Zimmerman, Manjusha Gaglani, Michael L. Jackson, Jennifer P. King, Mary Patricia Nowalk, Joyce Benoit, Anne Robertson, Swathi N. Thaker, Arnold S. Monto, Suzanne E. Ohmit

Abstract

 Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality with considerable economic costs, including lost work productivity. Influenza vaccines may reduce the economic burden through primary prevention of influenza and reduction in illness severity.  We examined illness severity and work productivity loss among working adults with medically-attended acute respiratory illnesses, and compared outcomes for patients with and without laboratory-confirmed influenza, and by influenza vaccination status among patients with influenza during the 2012-2013 influenza season.  Illnesses laboratory-confirmed as influenza (i.e. Cases) were subjectively assessed as more severe than illnesses not caused by influenza (i.e. Non-Cases) based on multiple measures, including current health status at study enrollment (<7 days from illness onset), and current activity and sleep quality status relative to usual. Influenza Cases reported missing 45% more work hours (20.5 vs. 15.0, P<.001) than Non-Cases, and subjectively assessed their work productivity as impeded to a greater degree (6.0 vs. 5.4, P<.001). Current health status and current activity relative to usual were subjectively assessed as modestly, but significantly, better for vaccinated influenza Cases compared with unvaccinated Cases; however, no significant modifications of sleep quality, missed work hours, or work productivity loss were noted for vaccinated subjects. . Influenza illnesses were more severe and resulted in more missed work hours and productivity loss than illnesses not confirmed as influenza. Modest reductions in illness severity for vaccinated influenza cases were observed. These findings highlight the burden of influenza illnesses and illustrate the importance of laboratory-confirmation of influenza outcomes in evaluations of vaccine effectiveness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Professor 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 16 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 29%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 20 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 436. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2021.
All research outputs
#33,396
of 17,125,476 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Infectious Diseases
#99
of 13,589 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#962
of 270,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Infectious Diseases
#2
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,125,476 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,589 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,285 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.