↓ Skip to main content

Michigan Publishing

Article Metrics

Media and Sexualization: State of Empirical Research, 1995–2015

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Sex Research, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 1,185)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
155 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
Title
Media and Sexualization: State of Empirical Research, 1995–2015
Published in
Journal of Sex Research, March 2016
DOI 10.1080/00224499.2016.1142496
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Monique Ward

Abstract

Sexually objectifying portrayals of women are a frequent occurrence in mainstream media, raising questions about the potential impact of exposure to this content on others' impressions of women and on women's views of themselves. The goal of this review was to synthesize empirical investigations testing effects of media sexualization. The focus was on research published in peer-reviewed, English-language journals between 1995 and 2015. A total of 109 publications that contained 135 studies were reviewed. The findings provided consistent evidence that both laboratory exposure and regular, everyday exposure to this content are directly associated with a range of consequences, including higher levels of body dissatisfaction, greater self-objectification, greater support of sexist beliefs and of adversarial sexual beliefs, and greater tolerance of sexual violence toward women. Moreover, experimental exposure to this content leads both women and men to have a diminished view of women's competence, morality, and humanity. Limitations with the existing research approaches and measures are discussed, and suggestions for future research directions are provided.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 155 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 109 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 24 21%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 9%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 12 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 43 38%
Social Sciences 24 21%
Arts and Humanities 7 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 4%
Chemistry 3 3%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 19 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 186. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2020.
All research outputs
#79,830
of 14,159,806 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Sex Research
#25
of 1,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,787
of 265,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Sex Research
#2
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,159,806 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,185 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.