↓ Skip to main content

Michigan Publishing

Article Metrics

Association Between Lifetime Marijuana Use and Cognitive Function in Middle Age

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Internal Medicine, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
55 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
229 tweeters
facebook
16 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
3 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
61 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Association Between Lifetime Marijuana Use and Cognitive Function in Middle Age
Published in
JAMA Internal Medicine, March 2016
DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7841
Pubmed ID
Authors

Reto Auer, Eric Vittinghoff, Kristine Yaffe, Arnaud Künzi, Stefan G. Kertesz, Deborah A. Levine, Emiliano Albanese, Rachel A. Whitmer, David R. Jacobs, Stephen Sidney, M. Maria Glymour, Mark J. Pletcher

Abstract

Marijuana use is increasingly common in the United States. It is unclear whether it has long-term effects on memory and other domains of cognitive function. To study the association between cumulative lifetime exposure to marijuana use and cognitive performance in middle age. We used data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a cohort of 5115 black and white men and women aged 18 to 30 years at baseline from March 25, 1985, to June 7, 1986 (year 0), and followed up over 25 years from June 7, 1986, to August 31, 2011, to estimate cumulative years of exposure to marijuana (1 year = 365 days of marijuana use) using repeated measures and to assess associations with cognitive function at year 25. Linear regression was used to adjust for demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, tobacco smoking, use of alcohol and illicit drugs, physical activity, depression, and results of the mirror star tracing test (a measure of cognitive function) at year 2. Data analysis was conducted from June 7, 1986, to August 31, 2011. Three domains of cognitive function were assessed at year 25 using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (verbal memory), the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (processing speed), and the Stroop Interference Test (executive function). Among 3385 participants with cognitive function measurements at the year 25 visit, 2852 (84.3%) reported past marijuana use, but only 392 (11.6%) continued to use marijuana into middle age. Current use of marijuana was associated with worse verbal memory and processing speed; cumulative lifetime exposure was associated with worse performance in all 3 domains of cognitive function. After excluding current users and adjusting for potential confounders, cumulative lifetime exposure to marijuana remained significantly associated with worse verbal memory. For each 5 years of past exposure, verbal memory was 0.13 standardized units lower (95% CI, -0.24 to -0.02; P = .02), corresponding to a mean of 1 of 2 participants remembering 1 word fewer from a list of 15 words for every 5 years of use. After adjustment, we found no associations with lower executive function (-0.03 [95% CI, -0.12 to 0.07]; P = .56) or processing speed (-0.04 [95% CI, -0.16 to 0.08]; P = .51). Past exposure to marijuana is associated with worse verbal memory but does not appear to affect other domains of cognitive function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 229 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 91 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 20 22%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 30%
Psychology 18 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 647. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2020.
All research outputs
#10,812
of 14,158,819 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Internal Medicine
#165
of 3,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#338
of 338,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Internal Medicine
#5
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,158,819 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,797 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 131.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.