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The pertussis enigma: reconciling epidemiology, immunology and evolution

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
36 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
Title
The pertussis enigma: reconciling epidemiology, immunology and evolution
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2016
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2015.2309
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthieu Domenech de Cellès, Felicia M. G. Magpantay, Aaron A. King, Pejman Rohani, Domenech de Cellès, Matthieu, Magpantay, Felicia M G, King, Aaron A, Rohani, Pejman

Abstract

Pertussis, a highly contagious respiratory infection, remains a public health priority despite the availability of vaccines for 70 years. Still a leading cause of mortality in developing countries, pertussis has re-emerged in several developed countries with high vaccination coverage. Resurgence of pertussis in these countries has routinely been attributed to increased awareness of the disease, imperfect vaccinal protection or high infection rates in adults. In this review, we first present 1980-2012 incidence data from 63 countries and show that pertussis resurgence is not universal. We further argue that the large geographical variation in trends probably precludes a simple explanation, such as the transition from whole-cell to acellular pertussis vaccines. Reviewing available evidence, we then propose that prevailing views on pertussis epidemiology are inconsistent with both historical and contemporary data. Indeed, we summarize epidemiological evidence showing that natural infection and vaccination both appear to provide long-term protection against transmission and disease, so that previously infected or vaccinated adults contribute little to overall transmission at a population level. Finally, we identify several promising avenues that may lead to a consistent explanation of global pertussis epidemiology and to more effective control strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
France 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Vietnam 1 1%
Unknown 72 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 16 21%
Researcher 16 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Master 5 6%
Other 21 27%
Unknown 1 1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 19%
Unspecified 13 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 9%
Environmental Science 3 4%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2018.
All research outputs
#370,413
of 11,628,139 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,260
of 6,933 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,046
of 331,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#43
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,628,139 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,933 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,848 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.