↓ Skip to main content

Michigan Publishing

Article Metrics

Formative evaluation of the video reflexive ethnography method, as applied to the physician–nurse dyad

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Quality & Safety, July 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,239)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
60 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Formative evaluation of the video reflexive ethnography method, as applied to the physician–nurse dyad
Published in
BMJ Quality & Safety, July 2018
DOI 10.1136/bmjqs-2017-007728
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milisa Manojlovich, Richard M Frankel, Molly Harrod, Alaa Heshmati, Timothy Hofer, Elizabeth Umberfield, Sarah Krein

Abstract

Despite decades of research and interventions, poor communication between physicians and nurses continues to be a primary contributor to adverse events in the hospital setting and a major challenge to improving patient safety. The lack of progress suggests that it is time to consider alternative approaches with greater potential to identify and improve communication than those used to date. We conducted a formative evaluation to assess the feasibility, acceptability and utility of using video reflexive ethnography (VRE) to examine, and potentially improve, communication between nurses and physicians. We begin with a brief description of the institutional review boardapproval process and recruitment activities, then explain how we conducted the formative evaluation by describing (1) the VRE process itself; (2) our assessment of the exposure to the VRE process; and (3) challenges encountered and lessons learnt as a result of the process, along with suggestions for change. Our formative evaluation demonstrates that it is feasible and acceptable to video-record communication between physicians and nurses during patient care rounds across many units at a large, academic medical centre. The lessons that we learnt helped to identify procedural changes for future projects. We also discuss the broader application of this methodology as a possible strategy for improving other important quality and safety practices in healthcare settings. The VRE process did generate increased reflection in both nurse and physician participants. Moreover, VRE has utility in assessing communication and, based on the comments of our participants, can serve as an intervention to possibly improve communication, with implications for patient safety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 36%
Researcher 3 27%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 18%
Other 1 9%
Librarian 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Social Sciences 2 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 481. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2018.
All research outputs
#13,970
of 11,868,645 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Quality & Safety
#6
of 1,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#761
of 249,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Quality & Safety
#2
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,868,645 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,239 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,364 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.