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An inverse latitudinal gradient in speciation rate for marine fishes

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
900 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
214 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
An inverse latitudinal gradient in speciation rate for marine fishes
Published in
Nature, July 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41586-018-0273-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rabosky, Daniel L., Chang, Jonathan, Title, Pascal O., Cowman, Peter F., Sallan, Lauren, Friedman, Matt, Kaschner, Kristin, Garilao, Cristina, Near, Thomas J., Coll, Marta, Alfaro, Michael E., Daniel L. Rabosky, Jonathan Chang, Pascal O. Title, Peter F. Cowman, Lauren Sallan, Matt Friedman, Kristin Kaschner, Cristina Garilao, Thomas J. Near, Marta Coll, Michael E. Alfaro

Abstract

Far more species of organisms are found in the tropics than in temperate and polar regions, but the evolutionary and ecological causes of this pattern remain controversial1,2. Tropical marine fish communities are much more diverse than cold-water fish communities found at higher latitudes3,4, and several explanations for this latitudinal diversity gradient propose that warm reef environments serve as evolutionary 'hotspots' for species formation5-8. Here we test the relationship between latitude, species richness and speciation rate across marine fishes. We assembled a time-calibrated phylogeny of all ray-finned fishes (31,526 tips, of which 11,638 had genetic data) and used this framework to describe the spatial dynamics of speciation in the marine realm. We show that the fastest rates of speciation occur in species-poor regions outside the tropics, and that high-latitude fish lineages form new species at much faster rates than their tropical counterparts. High rates of speciation occur in geographical regions that are characterized by low surface temperatures and high endemism. Our results reject a broad class of mechanisms under which the tropics serve as an evolutionary cradle for marine fish diversity and raise new questions about why the coldest oceans on Earth are present-day hotspots of species formation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 900 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 214 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 214 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 52 24%
Student > Master 35 16%
Researcher 33 15%
Student > Bachelor 26 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 9%
Other 49 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 124 58%
Environmental Science 33 15%
Unspecified 25 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 4%
Other 8 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 592. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2018.
All research outputs
#9,185
of 12,126,378 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#1,398
of 61,624 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#535
of 245,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#74
of 850 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,126,378 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 61,624 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 73.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,793 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 850 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.