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Soy protein improves tibial whole-bone and tissue-level biomechanical properties in ovariectomized and ovary-intact, low-fit female rats

Overview of attention for article published in Bone Reports, June 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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16 news outlets
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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Readers on

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4 Mendeley
Title
Soy protein improves tibial whole-bone and tissue-level biomechanical properties in ovariectomized and ovary-intact, low-fit female rats
Published in
Bone Reports, June 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.bonr.2018.05.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pamela S. Hinton, Laura C. Ortinau, Rebecca K. Dirkes, Emily L. Shaw, Matthew W. Richard, Terese Z. Zidon, Steven L. Britton, Lauren G. Koch, Victoria J. Vieira-Potter

Abstract

Osteoporosis and related fractures, decreased physical activity, and metabolic dysfunction are serious health concerns for postmenopausal women. Soy protein might counter the negative effects of menopause on bone and metabolic health due to the additive or synergistic effects of its bioactive components. To evaluate the effects of ovariectomy (OVX) and a soy-protein diet (SOY) on bone outcomes in female, low-capacity running (LCR) rats selectively bred for low aerobic fitness as a model of menopause. At 27 weeks of age, LCR rats (N = 40) underwent OVX or sham (SHAM) surgery and were randomized to one of two isocaloric and isonitrogenous plant-protein-based dietary treatments: 1) soy-protein (SOY; soybean meal); or, 2) control (CON, corn-gluten meal), resulting in four treatment groups. During the 30-week dietary intervention, animals were provided ad libitum access to food and water; body weight and food intake were measured weekly. At completion of the 30-week intervention, body composition was measured using EchoMRI; animals were fasted overnight, euthanized, and blood and hindlimbs collected. Plasma markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, OC; N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, P1NP) and resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, TRAP5b; C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, CTx) were measured using ELISA. Tibial trabecular microarchitecture and cortical geometry were evaluated using μCT; and torsional loading to failure was used to assess cortical biomechanical properties. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) content of the femur was measured using a fluorimetric assay, and was expressed relative to collagen content measured by a colorimetric OH-proline assay. Two-factor ANOVA or ANOVCA was used to test for significant main and interactive effects of ovarian status (OV STAT: OVX vs. SHAM) and DIET (SOY vs. CON); final body weight was included as a covariate for body-weight-dependent cortical geometry and biomechanical properties. OVX had significantly greater CTx than SHAM; SOY did not affect bone turnover markers. OVX adversely affected trabecular microarchitecture as evidenced by reduced BV/TV, trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), trabecular number (Tb.N), and connectivity density (Conn.D), and by increased trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) and structural model index (SMI). SOY increased BV/TV only in ovary-intact animals. There was no effect of OVX or SOY on tibial cortical geometry. In SHAM and OVX rats, SOY significantly improved whole-bone strength and stiffness; SOY also increased tissue-level stiffness and tended to increase tissue-level strength (p = 0.067). There was no effect of OVX or SOY on AGE content. Soy protein improved cortical bone biomechanical properties in female low-fit rats, regardless of ovarian hormone status.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 50%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Unspecified 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 119. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2018.
All research outputs
#102,615
of 11,946,339 outputs
Outputs from Bone Reports
#1
of 83 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,077
of 249,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bone Reports
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,946,339 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 83 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,003 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them