↓ Skip to main content

Michigan Publishing

Article Metrics

Orangutans venture out of the rainforest and into the Anthropocene

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
168 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
Title
Orangutans venture out of the rainforest and into the Anthropocene
Published in
Science Advances, June 2018
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1701422
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie N. Spehar, Douglas Sheil, Terry Harrison, Julien Louys, Marc Ancrenaz, Andrew J. Marshall, Serge A. Wich, Michael W. Bruford, Erik Meijaard

Abstract

Conservation benefits from understanding how adaptability and threat interact to determine a taxon's vulnerability. Recognizing how interactions with humans have shaped taxa such as the critically endangered orangutan (Pongo spp.) offers insights into this relationship. Orangutans are viewed as icons of wild nature, and most efforts to prevent their extinction have focused on protecting minimally disturbed habitat, with limited success. We synthesize fossil, archeological, genetic, and behavioral evidence to demonstrate that at least 70,000 years of human influence have shaped orangutan distribution, abundance, and ecology and will likely continue to do so in the future. Our findings indicate that orangutans are vulnerable to hunting but appear flexible in response to some other human activities. This highlights the need for a multifaceted, landscape-level approach to orangutan conservation that leverages sound policy and cooperation among government, private sector, and community stakeholders to prevent hunting, mitigate human-orangutan conflict, and preserve and reconnect remaining natural forests. Broad cooperation can be encouraged through incentives and strategies that focus on the common interests and concerns of different stakeholders. Orangutans provide an illustrative example of how acknowledging the long and pervasive influence of humans can improve strategies to preserve biodiversity in the Anthropocene.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 168 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 24%
Student > Master 14 22%
Researcher 9 14%
Unspecified 7 11%
Other 6 10%
Other 12 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 41%
Environmental Science 13 21%
Unspecified 11 17%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 244. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2019.
All research outputs
#51,217
of 13,519,065 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#398
of 3,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,397
of 268,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#34
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,519,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,304 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 122.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.