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Childhood hyperactivity/inattention and eating disturbances predict binge eating in adolescence

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 3,769)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
165 tweeters
googleplus
3 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
Title
Childhood hyperactivity/inattention and eating disturbances predict binge eating in adolescence
Published in
Psychological Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1017/s0033291715000148
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. R. Sonneville, J. P. Calzo, N. J. Horton, A. E. Field, R. D. Crosby, F. Solmi, N. Micali

Abstract

Identifying childhood predictors of binge eating and understanding risk mechanisms could help improve prevention and detection efforts. The aim of this study was to examine whether features of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as childhood eating disturbances, predicted binge eating later in adolescence. We studied specific risk factors for the development of binge eating during mid-adolescence among 7120 males and females from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a cohort study of children in the UK, using data from multiple informants to develop structural equation models. Repeated assessment of eating disturbances during childhood (mid-childhood overeating, late-childhood overeating and early-adolescent strong desire for food), as well as teacher- and parent-reported hyperactivity/inattention during mid- and late childhood, were considered as possible predictors of mid-adolescent binge eating. Prevalence of binge eating during mid-adolescence in our sample was 11.6%. The final model of predictors of binge eating during mid-adolescence included direct effects of late-childhood overeating [standardized estimate 0.145, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.038-0.259, p = 0.009] and early-adolescent strong desire for food (standardized estimate 0.088, 95% CI -0.002 to 0.169, p = 0.05). Hyperactivity/inattention during late childhood indirectly predicted binge eating during mid-adolescence (standardized estimate 0.085, 95% CI 0.007-0.128, p = 0.03) via late-childhood overeating and early-adolescent strong desire for food. Our findings indicate that early ADHD symptoms, in addition to an overeating phenotype, contribute to risk for adolescent binge eating. These findings lend support to the potential role of hyperactivity/inattention in the development of overeating and binge eating.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 165 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 79 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 16%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Other 20 25%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 28%
Psychology 21 26%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Unspecified 2 2%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 164. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2020.
All research outputs
#100,674
of 14,571,003 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Medicine
#44
of 3,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,756
of 232,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Medicine
#3
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,571,003 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.