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The difficulty of professional continuation among female doctors in Japan: a qualitative study of alumnae of 13 medical schools in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
23 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
The difficulty of professional continuation among female doctors in Japan: a qualitative study of alumnae of 13 medical schools in Japan
Published in
BMJ Open, January 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005845
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kyoko Nomura, Yuka Yamazaki, Larry D Gruppen, Saki Horie, Masumi Takeuchi, Jan Illing

Abstract

To investigate the difficulties Japanese female doctors face in continuing professional practice. A qualitative study using the Kawakita Jiro method. A survey conducted in 2011 of 13 private Japanese medical school alumni associations. 359 female doctors. Barriers of balancing work and gender role. The female doctors reported that professional practice was a struggle with long working hours due to a current shortage of doctors in Japan. There was also a severe shortage of childcare facilities in the workplace. Some women appeared to have low confidence in balancing the physician's job and personal life, resulting in low levels of professional pursuit. There appeared to be two types of stereotypical gender roles, including one expected from society, stating that "child rearing is a woman's job", and the other perceived by the women themselves, that some women had a very strong desire to raise their own children. Male doctors and some female doctors who were single or older were perceived to be less enthusiastic about supporting women who worked while raising children because these coworkers feared that they would have to perform additional work as a result of the women taking long periods of leave. Important factors identified for promoting the continuation of professional practice among female doctors in Japan were the need to improve working conditions, including cutting back on long working hours, a solution to the shortage of nurseries, a need for the introduction of educational interventions to clarify professional responsibilities, and redefinition of the gender division of labour for male and female doctors. In addition, we identified a need to modernise current employment practices by introducing temporary posts to cover maternity leave and introducing flexible working hours during specialist training, thus supporting and encouraging more women to continue their medical careers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Egypt 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 5 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Unspecified 4 13%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 13 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 31%
Unspecified 6 19%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 13%
Psychology 3 9%
Other 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2018.
All research outputs
#528,551
of 12,119,647 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#1,140
of 9,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,584
of 218,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#43
of 258 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,119,647 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,387 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 258 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.