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Association of a Negative Wealth Shock With All-Cause Mortality in Middle-aged and Older Adults in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
190 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
409 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
4 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Association of a Negative Wealth Shock With All-Cause Mortality in Middle-aged and Older Adults in the United States
Published in
JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, April 2018
DOI 10.1001/jama.2018.2055
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lindsay R. Pool, Sarah A. Burgard, Belinda L. Needham, Michael R. Elliott, Kenneth M. Langa, Carlos F. Mendes de Leon

Abstract

A sudden loss of wealth-a negative wealth shock-may lead to a significant mental health toll and also leave fewer monetary resources for health-related expenses. With limited years remaining to regain lost wealth in older age, the health consequences of these negative wealth shocks may be long-lasting. To determine whether a negative wealth shock was associated with all-cause mortality during 20 years of follow-up. The Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative prospective cohort study of US adults aged 51 through 61 years at study entry. The study population included 8714 adults, first assessed for a negative wealth shock in 1994 and followed biennially through 2014 (the most recent year of available data). Experiencing a negative wealth shock, defined as a loss of 75% or more of total net worth over a 2-year period, or asset poverty, defined as 0 or negative total net worth at study entry. Mortality data were collected from the National Death Index and postmortem interviews with family members. Marginal structural survival methods were used to account for the potential bias due to changes in health status that may both trigger negative wealth shocks and act as the mechanism through which negative wealth shocks lead to increased mortality. There were 8714 participants in the study sample (mean [SD] age at study entry, 55 [3.2] years; 53% women), 2430 experienced a negative wealth shock during follow-up, 749 had asset poverty at baseline, and 5535 had continuously positive wealth without shock. A total of 2823 deaths occurred during 80 683 person-years of follow-up. There were 30.6 vs 64.9 deaths per 1000 person-years for those with continuously positive wealth vs negative wealth shock (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.50; 95% CI, 1.36-1.67). There were 73.4 deaths per 1000 person-years for those with asset poverty at baseline (adjusted HR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.44-1.94; compared with continuously positive wealth). Among US adults aged 51 years and older, loss of wealth over 2 years was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality. Further research is needed to better understand the possible mechanisms for this association and determine whether there is potential value for targeted interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 409 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 20%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 13%
Other 8 11%
Other 17 22%
Unknown 4 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 14%
Psychology 6 8%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 21 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1823. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2020.
All research outputs
#1,839
of 15,633,277 outputs
Outputs from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#83
of 27,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66
of 279,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association
#8
of 409 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,633,277 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 27,898 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 58.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 409 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.