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The high burden of alcoholic cirrhosis in privately insured persons in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Hepatology, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 7,887)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
101 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
22 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
84 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
Title
The high burden of alcoholic cirrhosis in privately insured persons in the United States
Published in
Hepatology, May 2018
DOI 10.1002/hep.29887
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica L. Mellinger, Kerby Shedden, Gerald Scott Winder, Elliot Tapper, Megan Adams, Robert J Fontana, Michael L. Volk, Frederic C. Blow, Anna S.F. Lok

Abstract

Alcoholic cirrhosis (AC) is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in the United States (US). Rising rates of alcohol use disorders in the US will likely result in more alcoholic liver disease. Our aim was to determine the prevalence, healthcare utilization, and costs of AC among privately insured persons in the US. We collected data from persons aged 18-64 with AC (identified by ICD-9/ICD-10 codes) enrolled in the Truven MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database (2009-2015). We determined yearly prevalence, weighted to the national employer-sponsored, privately insured population. Using competing risk analysis, we estimated event rates for portal hypertensive complications and estimated the association between alcoholic cirrhosis and costs as well as admissions and readmissions. 294,215 people had cirrhosis in 2015 and 105,871 (36%) had AC. Mean age at AC diagnosis was 53.5 years. 32% were women. Over the 7 years queried, estimated national cirrhosis prevalence rose from 0.19% to 0.27% (p<0.001) and from 0.07% to 0.10% (p<0.001) for AC. Compared to non-AC, AC enrollees were significantly more likely to have portal hypertensive complications at diagnosis, and higher yearly cirrhosis and alcohol-related admissions (25 excess cirrhosis admissions and 6.3 excess alcohol-related admissions per 100 enrollees) as well as all-cause readmissions. Per-person costs in the first year after diagnosis nearly doubled for AC versus non-AC persons (US$44,835 vs 23,319). In a nationally representative cohort of privately insured persons, AC enrollees were disproportionately sicker at presentation, admitted and readmitted more often, and incurred nearly double the per-person healthcare costs compared to those with non-AC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 19%
Other 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Professor 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 17 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 40%
Psychology 5 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 15 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 826. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2021.
All research outputs
#11,941
of 17,954,410 outputs
Outputs from Hepatology
#2
of 7,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#408
of 288,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Hepatology
#1
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,954,410 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.