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Global Demand for Natural Resources Eliminated More Than 100,000 Bornean Orangutans

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 8,702)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
191 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
428 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
reddit
5 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
Title
Global Demand for Natural Resources Eliminated More Than 100,000 Bornean Orangutans
Published in
Current Biology, February 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2018.01.053
Pubmed ID
Authors

Voigt, Maria, Wich, Serge A., Ancrenaz, Marc, Meijaard, Erik, Abram, Nicola, Banes, Graham L., Campbell-Smith, Gail, d’Arcy, Laura J., Delgado, Roberto A., Erman, Andi, Gaveau, David, Goossens, Benoit, Heinicke, Stefanie, Houghton, Max, Husson, Simon J., Leiman, Ashley, Sanchez, Karmele Llano, Makinuddin, Niel, Marshall, Andrew J., Meididit, Ari, Miettinen, Jukka, Mundry, Roger, Musnanda, Nardiyono, Nurcahyo, Anton, Odom, Kisar, Panda, Adventus, Prasetyo, Didik, Priadjati, Aldrianto, Purnomo, Rafiastanto, Andjar, Russon, Anne E., Santika, Truly, Sihite, Jamartin, Spehar, Stephanie, Struebig, Matthew, Sulbaran-Romero, Enrique, Tjiu, Albertus, Wells, Jessie, Wilson, Kerrie A., Kühl, Hjalmar S., Maria Voigt, Serge A. Wich, Marc Ancrenaz, Erik Meijaard, Nicola Abram, Graham L. Banes, Gail Campbell-Smith, Laura J. d’Arcy, Roberto A. Delgado, Andi Erman, David Gaveau, Benoit Goossens, Stefanie Heinicke, Max Houghton, Simon J. Husson, Ashley Leiman, Karmele Llano Sanchez, Niel Makinuddin, Andrew J. Marshall, Ari Meididit, Jukka Miettinen, Roger Mundry, Anton Nurcahyo, Kisar Odom, Adventus Panda, Didik Prasetyo, Aldrianto Priadjati, Andjar Rafiastanto, Anne E. Russon, Truly Santika, Jamartin Sihite, Stephanie Spehar, Matthew Struebig, Enrique Sulbaran-Romero, Albertus Tjiu, Jessie Wells, Kerrie A. Wilson, Hjalmar S. Kühl, Voigt, M., Wich, S.A., Ancrenaz, M., Meijaard, E., Abram, N., Banes, G.L., Campbell-Smith, G., d'Arcy, L.J., Delgado, R.A., Erman, A., Gaveau, D.L.A., Goossens, B., Heinicke, S., Houghton, M., Husson, S.J., Leiman, A., Llano Sanchez, K., Makinuddin, N., Marshall, A.J., Meididit, A., Miettinen, J., Mundry, R., Musnanda, Nardiyono, Nurcahyo, A., Odom, K., Panda, A., Prasetyo, D., Priadjati, A., Purnomo, Rafiastanto, A., Russon, A.E., Santika, T., Sihite, J., Spehar, S., Struebig, M., Sulbaran-Romero, E., Tjiu, A., Wells, J., Wilson, K.A., Kühl, H.S.

Abstract

Unsustainable exploitation of natural resources is increasingly affecting the highly biodiverse tropics [1, 2]. Although rapid developments in remote sensing technology have permitted more precise estimates of land-cover change over large spatial scales [3-5], our knowledge about the effects of these changes on wildlife is much more sparse [6, 7]. Here we use field survey data, predictive density distribution modeling, and remote sensing to investigate the impact of resource use and land-use changes on the density distribution of Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). Our models indicate that between 1999 and 2015, half of the orangutan population was affected by logging, deforestation, or industrialized plantations. Although land clearance caused the most dramatic rates of decline, it accounted for only a small proportion of the total loss. A much larger number of orangutans were lost in selectively logged and primary forests, where rates of decline were less precipitous, but where far more orangutans are found. This suggests that further drivers, independent of land-use change, contribute to orangutan loss. This finding is consistent with studies reporting hunting as a major cause in orangutan decline [8-10]. Our predictions of orangutan abundance loss across Borneo suggest that the population decreased by more than 100,000 individuals, corroborating recent estimates of decline [11]. Practical solutions to prevent future orangutan decline can only be realized by addressing its complex causes in a holistic manner across political and societal sectors, such as in land-use planning, resource exploitation, infrastructure development, and education, and by increasing long-term sustainability [12].

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 428 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 26%
Student > Master 13 23%
Researcher 9 16%
Unspecified 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 39%
Environmental Science 16 28%
Unspecified 6 11%
Social Sciences 6 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Other 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1927. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2018.
All research outputs
#530
of 11,402,397 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#9
of 8,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54
of 309,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 274 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,402,397 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,702 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 274 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.