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At the Root: Defining and Halting Progression of Early Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
At the Root: Defining and Halting Progression of Early Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Published in
American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1164/rccm.201710-2028pp
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fernando J. Martinez, MeiLan K. Han, James P. Allinson, R. Graham Barr, Richard C. Boucher, Peter M. A. Calverley, Bartolome R. Celli, Stephanie A. Christenson, Ronald G. Crystal, Malin Fagerås, Christine M. Freeman, Lars Groenke, Eric A. Hoffman, Mehmet Kesimer, Kostantinos Kostikas, Robert Paine, Shahin Rafii, Stephen I. Rennard, Leopoldo N. Segal, Renat Shaykhiev, Christopher Stevenson, Ruth Tal-Singer, Jørgen Vestbo, Prescott G. Woodruff, Jeffrey L. Curtis, Jadwiga A. Wedzicha

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disorder with varying presentations and progression, but limited disease-modifying therapies. Trajectories of lung function decline in COPD differ significantly between individuals, with differences detectable in young adulthood. "Early disease" (initial manifestations in young individuals) should be distinguished from "late mild disease" (disease of mild severity in older individuals potentially present for decades). For research purposes, we propose an operational definition of early COPD: ever-smokers (≥10 pack-years) younger than 50 years with any of these abnormalities: (1) FEV1/FVC< lower limit of normal; (2) compatible CT abnormalities (airway abnormality and/or emphysema); or (3) FEV1 decline (≥60 mL/year). Biological underpinnings of early COPD are quite complex. Recent evidence implies that cigarette smoke-exposure induces sequential, stereotypical changes in distal airways, initially without inflammatory cell infiltration. Epithelial reprogramming is associated with mucus that is less readily cleared and with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor down-regulation accompanied by focal airway injury. Resulting differences in the community structure of the lung microbiome may be mechanistically important. Global gene analysis suggests that tissue degradation around small airways predominates over repair. Emphysema might also develop in early COPD due to loss of pulmonary endothelial cell-derived factors. To reduce COPD's long-term societal impact, the goal of interventions must change, from solely focusing on reducing symptoms and exacerbations in advanced disease, to halting pathological progression in early disease. This review attempts to stimulate studies investigating younger smokers to understand the causes, progression, clinical expression and potential therapeutic targets of early COPD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 41%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Unspecified 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 35%
Unspecified 8 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 44. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2018.
All research outputs
#322,598
of 12,271,791 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine
#237
of 6,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,638
of 330,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Respiratory & Critical Care Medicine
#11
of 131 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,271,791 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,782 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,882 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 131 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.