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Patterns of Sedentary Behavior and Mortality in U.S. Middle-Aged and Older Adults

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Internal Medicine, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 10,641)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
221 news outlets
blogs
16 blogs
twitter
4503 tweeters
facebook
40 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
66 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
160 Mendeley
Title
Patterns of Sedentary Behavior and Mortality in U.S. Middle-Aged and Older Adults
Published in
Annals of Internal Medicine, September 2017
DOI 10.7326/m17-0212
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keith M. Diaz, Virginia J. Howard, Brent Hutto, Natalie Colabianchi, John E. Vena, Monika M. Safford, Steven N. Blair, Steven P. Hooker

Abstract

Excessive sedentary time is ubiquitous in Western societies. Previous studies have relied on self-reporting to evaluate the total volume of sedentary time as a prognostic risk factor for mortality and have not examined whether the manner in which sedentary time is accrued (in short or long bouts) carries prognostic relevance. To examine the association between objectively measured sedentary behavior (its total volume and accrual in prolonged, uninterrupted bouts) and all-cause mortality. Prospective cohort study. Contiguous United States. 7985 black and white adults aged 45 years or older. Sedentary time was measured using a hip-mounted accelerometer. Prolonged, uninterrupted sedentariness was expressed as mean sedentary bout length. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated comparing quartiles 2 through 4 to quartile 1 for each exposure (quartile cut points: 689.7, 746.5, and 799.4 min/d for total sedentary time; 7.7, 9.6, and 12.4 min/bout for sedentary bout duration) in models that included moderate to vigorous physical activity. Over a median follow-up of 4.0 years, 340 participants died. In multivariable-adjusted models, greater total sedentary time (HR, 1.22 [95% CI, 0.74 to 2.02]; HR, 1.61 [CI, 0.99 to 2.63]; and HR, 2.63 [CI, 1.60 to 4.30]; P for trend < 0.001) and longer sedentary bout duration (HR, 1.03 [CI, 0.67 to 1.60]; HR, 1.22 [CI, 0.80 to 1.85]; and HR, 1.96 [CI, 1.31 to 2.93]; P for trend < 0.001) were both associated with a higher risk for all-cause mortality. Evaluation of their joint association showed that participants classified as high for both sedentary characteristics (high sedentary time [≥12.5 h/d] and high bout duration [≥10 min/bout]) had the greatest risk for death. Participants may not be representative of the general U.S. population. Both the total volume of sedentary time and its accrual in prolonged, uninterrupted bouts are associated with all-cause mortality, suggestive that physical activity guidelines should target reducing and interrupting sedentary time to reduce risk for death. National Institutes of Health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4,503 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 160 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 18%
Researcher 27 17%
Student > Master 21 13%
Unspecified 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 11%
Other 46 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 38 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 22%
Sports and Recreations 15 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 9%
Psychology 13 8%
Other 45 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2505. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2019.
All research outputs
#410
of 13,241,521 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Internal Medicine
#6
of 10,641 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17
of 267,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Internal Medicine
#3
of 153 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,241,521 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,641 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,616 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 153 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.