↓ Skip to main content

Michigan Publishing

Article Metrics

Molecular Phylogenetics and the Diversification of Hummingbirds

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
10 blogs
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
87 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
215 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
565 Mendeley
Title
Molecular Phylogenetics and the Diversification of Hummingbirds
Published in
Current Biology, April 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2014.03.016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jimmy A. McGuire, Christopher C. Witt, J.V. Remsen, Ammon Corl, Daniel L. Rabosky, Douglas L. Altshuler, Robert Dudley

Abstract

The tempo of species diversification in large clades can reveal fundamental evolutionary mechanisms that operate on large temporal and spatial scales. Hummingbirds have radiated into a diverse assemblage of specialized nectarivores comprising 338 species, but their evolutionary history has not, until now, been comprehensively explored. We studied hummingbird diversification by estimating a time-calibrated phylogeny for 284 hummingbird species, demonstrating that hummingbirds invaded South America by ∼22 million years ago, and subsequently diversified into nine principal clades (see [5-7]). Using ancestral state reconstruction and diversification analyses, we (1) estimate the age of the crown-group hummingbird assemblage, (2) investigate the timing and patterns of lineage accumulation for hummingbirds overall and regionally, and (3) evaluate the role of Andean uplift in hummingbird speciation. Detailed analyses reveal disparate clade-specific processes that allowed for ongoing species diversification. One factor was significant variation among clades in diversification rates. For example, the nine principal clades of hummingbirds exhibit ∼15-fold variation in net diversification rates, with evidence for accelerated speciation of a clade that includes the Bee, Emerald, and Mountain Gem groups of hummingbirds. A second factor was colonization of key geographic regions, which opened up new ecological niches. For example, some clades diversified in the context of the uplift of the Andes Mountains, whereas others were affected by the formation of the Panamanian land bridge. Finally, although species accumulation is slowing in all groups of hummingbirds, several major clades maintain rapid rates of diversification on par with classical examples of rapid adaptive radiation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 565 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 1%
Brazil 5 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Chile 3 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Colombia 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Other 9 2%
Unknown 526 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 124 22%
Student > Bachelor 91 16%
Researcher 85 15%
Student > Master 83 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 40 7%
Other 93 16%
Unknown 49 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 373 66%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 8%
Environmental Science 39 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 2%
Engineering 6 1%
Other 28 5%
Unknown 62 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 210. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2021.
All research outputs
#92,917
of 16,651,954 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#574
of 11,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,059
of 194,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#12
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,651,954 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,544 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,648 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.