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Early Diverging Fungi: Diversity and Impact at the Dawn of Terrestrial Life

Overview of attention for article published in Annual Review of Microbiology, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 762)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
45 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
Title
Early Diverging Fungi: Diversity and Impact at the Dawn of Terrestrial Life
Published in
Annual Review of Microbiology, March 2017
DOI 10.1146/annurev-micro-030117-020324
Pubmed ID
Authors

Berbee, Mary L., James, Timothy Y., Strullu-Derrien, Christine, Mary L. Berbee, Timothy Y. James, Christine Strullu-Derrien

Abstract

As decomposers or plant pathogens, fungi deploy invasive growth and powerful carbohydrate active enzymes to reduce multicellular plant tissues to humus and simple sugars. Fungi are perhaps also the most important mutualistic symbionts in modern ecosystems, transporting poorly soluble mineral nutrients to plants and thus enhancing the growth of vegetation. However, at their origin over a billion years ago, fungus-like plants and animals were unicellular marine microbes. Like the other multicellular kingdoms, Fungi evolved increased size, complexity, and metabolic functioning. Interactions of fungi with plants changed terrestrial ecology and geology and modified the Earth's atmosphere. In this review, we discuss the diversification and ecological roles of the fungi over their first 600 million years, from their origin through their colonization of land, drawing on phylogenomic evidence for their relationships and metabolic capabilities and on molecular dating, fossils, and modeling of Earth's paleoclimate. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Microbiology Volume 71 is September 8, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 45 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czech Republic 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 28%
Researcher 18 25%
Student > Master 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Unspecified 6 8%
Other 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 57%
Environmental Science 10 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 14%
Unspecified 9 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Other 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2018.
All research outputs
#423,676
of 11,536,085 outputs
Outputs from Annual Review of Microbiology
#18
of 762 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,962
of 266,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annual Review of Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,536,085 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 762 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,151 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them