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What Would I Know About Mercy? Faith and Optimistic Expectancies Among African Americans

Overview of attention for article published in Race and Social Problems, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 197)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
41 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
Title
What Would I Know About Mercy? Faith and Optimistic Expectancies Among African Americans
Published in
Race and Social Problems, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s12552-016-9190-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacqueline S. Mattis, Wizdom Powell, Nyasha A. Grayman, Yohance Murray, Yasmin C. Cole-Lewis, Janelle R. Goodwill

Abstract

A small body of research has begun to explore the association between faith and optimism among African Americans. However, missing from the extant work is an examination of the extent to which traditional indices of religious commitment work together with beliefs about God to shape optimism. The present study examines the utility of indices of social location, religious commitment (i.e., early and current religious service attendance, subjective religiosity), belief about the quality of one's relationship with God (i.e., a belief that one is connected to a loving God), and beliefs about being the recipient of divine forgiveness for predicting dispositional optimism among a sample of community residing African American adults (N = 241). Age, subjective religiosity, and organizational religiosity were positively related to optimism in bivariate analyses. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated a significant association between age, subjective religiosity, and optimism; however, those associations were eliminated once relationship with God and belief in one's forgiveness by God were entered into the model. Only belief in God's love predicted optimism in multivariate analyses. Serial mediation analyses revealed that beliefs about the quality of one's relationship with God and belief in divine forgiveness fully mediated the relationship between subjective religiosity and optimism, but that the relationship is driven largely by relationship with God. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 20%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 10%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 37%
Social Sciences 7 23%
Unspecified 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 341. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2021.
All research outputs
#48,706
of 16,636,435 outputs
Outputs from Race and Social Problems
#1
of 197 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,867
of 264,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Race and Social Problems
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,636,435 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 197 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.