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An early fossil remora (Echeneoidea) reveals the evolutionary assembly of the adhesion disc

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
94 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
Title
An early fossil remora (Echeneoidea) reveals the evolutionary assembly of the adhesion disc
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2013
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.1200
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matt Friedman, Zerina Johanson, Richard C. Harrington, Thomas J. Near, Mark R. Graham

Abstract

The adhesion disc of living remoras (Echeneoidea: Echeneidae) represents one of the most remarkable structural innovations within fishes. Although homology between the spinous dorsal fin of generalized acanthomorph fishes and the remora adhesion disc is widely accepted, the sequence of evolutionary-rather than developmental-transformations leading from one to the other has remained unclear. Here, we show that the early remora †Opisthomyzon (Echeneoidea: †Opisthomyzonidae), from the early Oligocene (Rupelian) of Switzerland, is a stem-group echeneid and provides unique insights into the evolutionary assembly of the unusual body plan characteristic of all living remoras. The adhesion disc of †Opisthomyzon retains ancestral features found in the spiny dorsal fins of remora outgroups, and corroborates developmental interpretations of the homology of individual skeletal components of the disc. †Opisthomyzon indicates that the adhesion disc originated in a postcranial position, and that other specializations (including the origin of pectination, subdivision of median fin spines into paired lamellae, increase in segment count and migration to a supracranial position) took place later in the evolutionary history of remoras. This phylogenetic sequence of transformation finds some parallels in the order of ontogenetic changes to the disc documented for living remoras.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 94 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Other 11 24%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 56%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 16%
Environmental Science 5 11%
Engineering 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 2 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 85. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2020.
All research outputs
#265,675
of 16,092,163 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#775
of 8,312 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,080
of 122,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#11
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,092,163 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,312 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,693 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.