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Genetic Structure, Self-Identified Race/Ethnicity, and Confounding in Case-Control Association Studies

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Human Genetics, February 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 4,378)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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343 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
203 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Genetic Structure, Self-Identified Race/Ethnicity, and Confounding in Case-Control Association Studies
Published in
American Journal of Human Genetics, February 2005
DOI 10.1086/427888
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hua Tang, Tom Quertermous, Beatriz Rodriguez, Sharon L.R. Kardia, Xiaofeng Zhu, Andrew Brown, James S. Pankow, Michael A. Province, Steven C. Hunt, Eric Boerwinkle, Nicholas J. Schork, Neil J. Risch

Abstract

We have analyzed genetic data for 326 microsatellite markers that were typed uniformly in a large multiethnic population-based sample of individuals as part of a study of the genetics of hypertension (Family Blood Pressure Program). Subjects identified themselves as belonging to one of four major racial/ethnic groups (white, African American, East Asian, and Hispanic) and were recruited from 15 different geographic locales within the United States and Taiwan. Genetic cluster analysis of the microsatellite markers produced four major clusters, which showed near-perfect correspondence with the four self-reported race/ethnicity categories. Of 3,636 subjects of varying race/ethnicity, only 5 (0.14%) showed genetic cluster membership different from their self-identified race/ethnicity. On the other hand, we detected only modest genetic differentiation between different current geographic locales within each race/ethnicity group. Thus, ancient geographic ancestry, which is highly correlated with self-identified race/ethnicity--as opposed to current residence--is the major determinant of genetic structure in the U.S. population. Implications of this genetic structure for case-control association studies are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 188 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 203 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 10 5%
Brazil 3 1%
Uruguay 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 181 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 44 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 21%
Student > Bachelor 22 11%
Professor 21 10%
Student > Master 19 9%
Other 54 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 72 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 18%
Psychology 18 9%
Social Sciences 18 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 7%
Other 44 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 179. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 December 2018.
All research outputs
#63,931
of 12,287,675 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Human Genetics
#29
of 4,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,676
of 11,664,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Human Genetics
#29
of 4,247 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,287,675 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,378 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,664,482 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,247 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.