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New Electrocardiographic Changes in Patients Diagnosed with Pulmonary Embolism

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Emergency Medicine, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
40 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
Title
New Electrocardiographic Changes in Patients Diagnosed with Pulmonary Embolism
Published in
Journal of Emergency Medicine, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jemermed.2016.09.009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Co, Ivan, Eilbert, Wesley, Chiganos, Terry, Ivan Co, Wesley Eilbert, Terry Chiganos

Abstract

The electronic medical record is a relatively new technology that allows quick review of patients' previous medical records, including previous electrocardiograms (ECGs). Previous studies have evaluated ECG patterns predictive of pulmonary embolism (PE) at the time of PE diagnosis, though none have examined ECG changes in these patients when compared with their previous ECGs. Our aim was to identify the most common ECG changes in patients with known PE when their ECGs were compared with their previous ECGs. A retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with PE in the emergency department was performed. Each patient's presenting ECG was compared with their most recent ECG obtained before diagnosis of PE. A total of 352 cases were reviewed. New T wave inversions, commonly in the inferior leads, were the most common change found, occurring in 34.4% of cases. New T wave flattening, also most commonly in the inferior leads, was the second most common change, occurring in 29.5%. A new sinus tachycardia occurred in 27.3% of cases. In 24.1% of patients, no new ECG changes were noted, with this finding more likely to occur in patients younger than 60 years. The most common ECG changes when compared with previous ECG in the setting of PE are T wave inversion and flattening, most commonly in the inferior leads, and occurring in approximately one-third of cases. Approximately one-quarter of patients will have a new sinus tachycardia, and approximately one-quarter will have no change in their ECG.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 17%
Unknown 4 67%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Unknown 4 67%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 33. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2018.
All research outputs
#388,510
of 11,622,980 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Emergency Medicine
#68
of 2,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,089
of 324,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Emergency Medicine
#3
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,622,980 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.