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A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Internal Medicine, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 3,166)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
160 news outlets
blogs
23 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
499 tweeters
facebook
26 Facebook pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
133 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
Title
A Comparison of the Prevalence of Dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012
Published in
JAMA Internal Medicine, January 2017
DOI 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6807
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth M. Langa, Eric B. Larson, Eileen M. Crimmins, Jessica D. Faul, Deborah A. Levine, Mohammed U. Kabeto, David R. Weir

Abstract

The aging of the US population is expected to lead to a large increase in the number of adults with dementia, but some recent studies in the United States and other high-income countries suggest that the age-specific risk of dementia may have declined over the past 25 years. Clarifying current and future population trends in dementia prevalence and risk has important implications for patients, families, and government programs. To compare the prevalence of dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012. We used data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative, population-based longitudinal survey of individuals in the United States 65 years or older from the 2000 (n = 10 546) and 2012 (n = 10 511) waves of the HRS. Dementia was identified in each year using HRS cognitive measures and validated methods for classifying self-respondents, as well as those represented by a proxy. Logistic regression was used to identify socioeconomic and health variables associated with change in dementia prevalence between 2000 and 2012. The study cohorts had an average age of 75.0 years (95% CI, 74.8-75.2 years) in 2000 and 74.8 years (95% CI, 74.5-75.1 years) in 2012 (P = .24); 58.4% (95% CI, 57.3%-59.4%) of the 2000 cohort was female compared with 56.3% (95% CI, 55.5%-57.0%) of the 2012 cohort (P < .001). Dementia prevalence among those 65 years or older decreased from 11.6% (95% CI, 10.7%-12.7%) in 2000 to 8.8% (95% CI, 8.2%-9.4%) (8.6% with age- and sex-standardization) in 2012 (P < .001). More years of education was associated with a lower risk for dementia, and average years of education increased significantly (from 11.8 years [95% CI, 11.6-11.9 years] to 12.7 years [95% CI, 12.6-12.9 years]; P < .001) between 2000 and 2012. The decline in dementia prevalence occurred even though there was a significant age- and sex-adjusted increase between years in the cardiovascular risk profile (eg, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity) among older US adults. The prevalence of dementia in the United States declined significantly between 2000 and 2012. An increase in educational attainment was associated with some of the decline in dementia prevalence, but the full set of social, behavioral, and medical factors contributing to the decline is still uncertain. Continued monitoring of trends in dementia incidence and prevalence will be important for better gauging the full future societal impact of dementia as the number of older adults increases in the decades ahead.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 499 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 108 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 23%
Student > Master 17 15%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 12%
Other 11 10%
Other 31 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 40%
Unspecified 17 15%
Social Sciences 11 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Psychology 7 6%
Other 23 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1775. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2018.
All research outputs
#728
of 11,946,339 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Internal Medicine
#16
of 3,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46
of 326,845 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Internal Medicine
#4
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,946,339 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,166 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 121.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,845 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.