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A Dietary Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota Degrades the Colonic Mucus Barrier and Enhances Pathogen Susceptibility

Overview of attention for article published in Cell, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
9 blogs
twitter
585 tweeters
facebook
30 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
163 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
645 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
A Dietary Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota Degrades the Colonic Mucus Barrier and Enhances Pathogen Susceptibility
Published in
Cell, November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2016.10.043
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mahesh S. Desai, Anna M. Seekatz, Nicole M. Koropatkin, Nobuhiko Kamada, Christina A. Hickey, Mathis Wolter, Nicholas A. Pudlo, Sho Kitamoto, Nicolas Terrapon, Arnaud Muller, Vincent B. Young, Bernard Henrissat, Paul Wilmes, Thaddeus S. Stappenbeck, Gabriel Núñez, Eric C. Martens, Desai, Mahesh S, Seekatz, Anna M, Koropatkin, Nicole M, Kamada, Nobuhiko, Hickey, Christina A, Wolter, Mathis, Pudlo, Nicholas A, Kitamoto, Sho, Terrapon, Nicolas, Muller, Arnaud, Young, Vincent B, Henrissat, Bernard, Wilmes, Paul, Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S, Núñez, Gabriel, Martens, Eric C, Mahesh S. Desai, Anna M. Seekatz, Nicole M. Koropatkin, Christina A. Hickey, Nicholas A. Pudlo, Vincent B. Young, Thaddeus S. Stappenbeck, Eric C. Martens

Abstract

Despite the accepted health benefits of consuming dietary fiber, little is known about the mechanisms by which fiber deprivation impacts the gut microbiota and alters disease risk. Using a gnotobiotic mouse model, in which animals were colonized with a synthetic human gut microbiota composed of fully sequenced commensal bacteria, we elucidated the functional interactions between dietary fiber, the gut microbiota, and the colonic mucus barrier, which serves as a primary defense against enteric pathogens. We show that during chronic or intermittent dietary fiber deficiency, the gut microbiota resorts to host-secreted mucus glycoproteins as a nutrient source, leading to erosion of the colonic mucus barrier. Dietary fiber deprivation, together with a fiber-deprived, mucus-eroding microbiota, promotes greater epithelial access and lethal colitis by the mucosal pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium. Our work reveals intricate pathways linking diet, the gut microbiome, and intestinal barrier dysfunction, which could be exploited to improve health using dietary therapeutics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 585 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 645 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 1%
Japan 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Other 6 <1%
Unknown 618 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 157 24%
Researcher 132 20%
Student > Master 107 17%
Student > Bachelor 69 11%
Other 37 6%
Other 143 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 255 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 114 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 84 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 80 12%
Unspecified 47 7%
Other 65 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 607. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2018.
All research outputs
#8,107
of 11,623,348 outputs
Outputs from Cell
#57
of 14,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#578
of 323,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell
#5
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,623,348 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,160 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,405 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.