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How Strongly Does Appetite Counter Weight Loss? Quantification of the Feedback Control of Human Energy Intake

Overview of attention for article published in Obesity, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
Title
How Strongly Does Appetite Counter Weight Loss? Quantification of the Feedback Control of Human Energy Intake
Published in
Obesity, November 2016
DOI 10.1002/oby.21653
Pubmed ID
Authors

Polidori, David, Sanghvi, Arjun, Seeley, Randy J., Hall, Kevin D., Seeley, Randy J, Hall, Kevin D, David Polidori, Arjun Sanghvi, Randy J. Seeley, Kevin D. Hall, Randy Seeley

Abstract

To quantify the feedback control of energy intake in response to long-term covert manipulation of energy balance in free-living humans. A validated mathematical method was used to calculate energy intake changes during a 52-week placebo-controlled trial in 153 patients treated with canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter inhibitor that increases urinary glucose excretion, thereby resulting in weight loss without patients being directly aware of the energy deficit. The relationship between the body weight time course and the calculated energy intake changes was analyzed using principles from engineering control theory. It was discovered that weight loss leads to a proportional increase in appetite resulting in eating above baseline by ∼100 kcal/day per kilogram of lost weight-an amount more than threefold larger than the corresponding energy expenditure adaptations. While energy expenditure adaptations have often been considered the main reason for slowing of weight loss and subsequent regain, feedback control of energy intake plays an even larger role and helps explain why long-term maintenance of a reduced body weight is so difficult.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 196 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 71 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 19%
Researcher 12 16%
Other 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Other 14 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 15%
Sports and Recreations 11 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 11%
Other 12 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 200. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2018.
All research outputs
#52,429
of 11,805,714 outputs
Outputs from Obesity
#66
of 2,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,965
of 255,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Obesity
#3
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,805,714 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,785 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,843 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.