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Positive Psychology Progress: Empirical Validation of Interventions.

Overview of attention for article published in American Psychologist, January 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 2,329)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
blogs
13 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages

Readers on

mendeley
3042 Mendeley
Title
Positive Psychology Progress: Empirical Validation of Interventions.
Published in
American Psychologist, January 2005
DOI 10.1037/0003-066x.60.5.410
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin E. P. Seligman, Tracy A. Steen, Nansook Park, Christopher Peterson

Abstract

Positive psychology has flourished in the last 5 years. The authors review recent developments in the field, including books, meetings, courses, and conferences. They also discuss the newly created classification of character strengths and virtues, a positive complement to the various editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (e. g., American Psychiatric Association, 1994), and present some cross-cultural findings that suggest a surprising ubiquity of strengths and virtues. Finally, the authors focus on psychological interventions that increase individual happiness. In a 6-group, random-assignment, placebo-controlled Internet study, the authors tested 5 purported happiness interventions and 1 plausible control exercise. They found that 3 of the interventions lastingly increased happiness and decreased depressive symptoms. Positive interventions can supplement traditional interventions that relieve suffering and may someday be the practical legacy of positive psychology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3,042 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 57 2%
United Kingdom 24 <1%
Germany 17 <1%
Australia 13 <1%
Spain 8 <1%
Portugal 8 <1%
South Africa 7 <1%
Canada 5 <1%
Japan 4 <1%
Other 55 2%
Unknown 2844 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 775 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 495 16%
Student > Bachelor 444 15%
Researcher 248 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 247 8%
Other 584 19%
Unknown 249 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 1754 58%
Social Sciences 275 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 190 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 109 4%
Arts and Humanities 58 2%
Other 332 11%
Unknown 324 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 476. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2020.
All research outputs
#24,402
of 15,621,828 outputs
Outputs from American Psychologist
#6
of 2,329 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,526
of 14,654,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Psychologist
#3
of 1,763 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,621,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,329 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 14,654,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,763 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.