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Influenza Vaccination as Secondary Prevention for Cardiovascular Disease

Overview of attention for article published in Circulation, October 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
2 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
78 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
Title
Influenza Vaccination as Secondary Prevention for Cardiovascular Disease
Published in
Circulation, October 2006
DOI 10.1161/circulationaha.106.178242
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew M. Davis, Kathryn Taubert, Andrea L. Benin, David W. Brown, George A. Mensah, Larry M. Baddour, Sandra Dunbar, Harlan M. Krumholz

Abstract

Evidence from cohort studies and a randomized clinical trial indicates that annual vaccination against seasonal influenza prevents cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients with cardiovascular conditions. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology recommend influenza immunization with inactivated vaccine (administered intramuscularly) as part of comprehensive secondary prevention in persons with coronary and other atherosclerotic vascular disease (Class I, Level B). Immunization with live, attenuated vaccine (administered intranasally) is not currently recommended [corrected] for persons with cardiovascular conditions. It is important to note that influenza vaccination coverage levels overall and in this population remain well below national goals and are marked by disparities across different age and ethnic groups. One of the barriers to vaccination for patients with cardiovascular disease is that cardiology practices frequently do not stock and administer influenza vaccine. Healthcare providers who treat individuals with cardiovascular disease can help improve influenza vaccination coverage rates by providing and strongly recommending vaccination to their patients before and throughout the influenza season.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Spain 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 56 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Other 6 10%
Professor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 20 32%
Unknown 6 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 59%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2020.
All research outputs
#431,082
of 14,776,742 outputs
Outputs from Circulation
#1,250
of 16,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,588
of 288,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Circulation
#17
of 172 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,776,742 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,593 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 172 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.