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Spontaneous Altruism by Chimpanzees and Young Children

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Biology, June 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#40 of 3,761)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
49 news outlets
blogs
17 blogs
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
273 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
507 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
Title
Spontaneous Altruism by Chimpanzees and Young Children
Published in
PLoS Biology, June 2007
DOI 10.1371/journal.pbio.0050184
Pubmed ID
Authors

Felix Warneken, Brian Hare, Alicia P Melis, Daniel Hanus, Michael Tomasello, Warneken F, Hare B, Melis AP, Hanus D, Tomasello M, Frans B. M de Waal

Abstract

People often act on behalf of others. They do so without immediate personal gain, at cost to themselves, and even toward unfamiliar individuals. Many researchers have claimed that such altruism emanates from a species-unique psychology not found in humans' closest living evolutionary relatives, such as the chimpanzee. In favor of this view, the few experimental studies on altruism in chimpanzees have produced mostly negative results. In contrast, we report experimental evidence that chimpanzees perform basic forms of helping in the absence of rewards spontaneously and repeatedly toward humans and conspecifics. In two comparative studies, semi-free ranging chimpanzees helped an unfamiliar human to the same degree as did human infants, irrespective of being rewarded (experiment 1) or whether the helping was costly (experiment 2). In a third study, chimpanzees helped an unrelated conspecific gain access to food in a novel situation that required subjects to use a newly acquired skill on behalf of another individual. These results indicate that chimpanzees share crucial aspects of altruism with humans, suggesting that the roots of human altruism may go deeper than previous experimental evidence suggested.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 507 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 3%
United Kingdom 10 2%
Germany 6 1%
France 4 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
Japan 3 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Other 17 3%
Unknown 444 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 20%
Researcher 98 19%
Student > Bachelor 89 18%
Student > Master 67 13%
Professor 38 7%
Other 113 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 219 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 151 30%
Unspecified 31 6%
Social Sciences 28 6%
Neuroscience 12 2%
Other 66 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 502. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2018.
All research outputs
#12,566
of 11,795,040 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Biology
#40
of 3,761 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,430
of 11,141,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Biology
#40
of 3,747 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,795,040 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,761 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 11,141,585 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,747 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.